Your F***ing Sunny Day (Episode 25)

  1. George Maple – Talk Talk
  2. Tennyson – Like What
  3. Flume & Chet Faker – Drop the Game
  4. Solomon Grey – Broken Light
  5. GESAFFELSTEIN – PURSUIT
  6. Woodkid – Iron (Official Video)
  7. Trentemøller: Complicated
  8. Tosca – Have Some Fun
  9. Kelpe – “Answered”
  10. Glitterbug – Calcutta
  11. Boards of Canada – Everything You Do is a Balloon
  12. Tycho – See
  13. Oneohtrix Point Never – Animals (Director’s Cut)
  14. Jon Hopkins – “Open Eye Signal”
  15. FKA twigs – M3LL155X

The Eyes Of Laura Mars -Soundtrack

Sometimes, not always, but sometimes people just need a little bit of Disco in their lives, a need that can be satisfied by this soundtrack. Best known of course is the title track by Babs Streisand, but there’s a lot of really good tracks on it other than that. Before I go any further, just in case you’ve never seen the film, here’s a trailer.

So the plot kicks off  with Laura Mars (Played by Faye Dunaway) who is a glamorous fashion photographer specialising in stylised violence (based upon the work of Helmut Newton, who provided the photos used for the film.) In the middle of controversy over whether her photographs glorify violence and are demeaning to women, Laura begins seeing, in first person through the eyes of the killer, real-time visions of the murders of her friends and colleagues.

It was originally a vehicle for Babs but she didn’t appear in the film because she thought it too kinky, but did take on the Love Theme, which produced a modest hit, peaking at number 21

Side One
No. Title Writer(s) Artist Length
1. “Prisoner (Love Theme from Eyes of Laura Mars)” Karen Lawrence, John DeSautels Barbra Streisand 3:53
2. “Laura’s Nightmare” Artie Kane Artie Kane 2:06
3. “Burn” George Michalski, Nikki Oosterveen Michalski & Oosterveen 4:16
4. “Elaine” Artie Kane Artie Kane 1:25
5. “Laura & Neville (Instrumental)” Artie Kane Artie Kane 2:33
6. “Medley:
Native New Yorker
(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty
Prisoner (Disco Instrumental)”
Various:
Sandy Linzer & Denny Randell
Harry Wayne Casey & Richard Finch
Artie Kane
Various:
Odyssey
KC & The Sunshine Band
Artie Kane
4:33
Side Two
No. Title Writer(s) Artist Length
1. “Laura – Warehouse” Artie Kane Artie Kane 1:11
2. Let’s All Chant Michael Zager, Alvin Fields Michael Zager Band 4:05
3. “Laura & Neville (Dialogue & Vocal)” Artie Kane Artie Kane 2:33
4. “Lulu & Michelle” Artie Kane Artie Kane 3:06
5. “Love & Pity” Artie Kane Artie Kane 4:10
6. “Love Theme from Eyes of Laura Mars (Prisoner) – Reprise” Karen Lawrence, John DeSautels Barbra Streisand 3:56

Track A6 is totally Disco, although this Medley is joined together with sticky tape where the glue is old and it doesn’t quite fit anymore. That having been said, there was a point this evening where I followed instructions closely and there was some shaking of booty.

I saw the film years ago, on TV, and it is a bit crap to be honest, although the idea was pretty good as was a rather youthful Tommy Lee Jones. The soundtrack isn’t actually all that Disco, it’s a mix of incidental music, a few Disco, a torch song and some dialogue, but I still enjoyed listening to it and I do rather like the cover, it’s pretty cool.

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The back cover not so much, but very of its time:

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And here is the whole thing should you want to have a listen:

This is Johnny Cash

I recently bought a job lot of 30 soundtracks for next to nothing, there were only 4 or 5 that I was actually interested in so I have 25 that will probably never get played, or no more than once anyway. Amongst the 30 was this:

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It’s André Kostelanetz And His Orchestra ‎– Grand Canyon Suite, which is a very good listen actually, but what is rathe rodd about it is over 11 minutes of Johnny Cash explaining how they got the sound effects for the Grand Canyon Suite, about taking mules into the canyon bottom and setting up recording equipment and such like. It’s really rather odd, but I know this, Cash should have read ‘The Gruffalo’, it would have been amazing.

I found the suite, so you can listen to that if you like, the Cash bit isn’t included though, which is a shame:

Found it on Youtube:

I’ll get around to the others another time, this just struck me as rather odd.

Mix Tape: Volume 3: Side 2 – There is beauty in everything

Side 2 of the 3rd volume mix tape – There is beauty in everything

Roger Goula Something About Silence
Hammock Then the Quiet Explosion
Daughter Touch
Eluvium Regenerative Being
Darkside Metatron
The Future Sound Of London Cascade (Part 1)
Mark Pritchard, Thom Yorke Beautiful People
Glitterbug Dust
Solomon Grey Choir To The Wild – Extended
Beth Gibbons, Rustin Man Mysteries – 1
Fever Ray When I Grow Up
FKA twigs Pendulum
Massive Attack, Azekel Ritual Spirit

Available on spotify:

or apple music: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/playlist/there-is-beauty-in-everything/idpl.85b69c262d0945d399ed36d1f77167e5

Side 1 and other mix tapes available HERE

Playing 45’s Tonight

Playing some 45’s tonight. 3 are on instagram, and if I have this right, down below:

#banshees #christine #siouxsieandthebanshees #45s #vinyl #vinylrecords #vinylcommunity

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#iandury #blockheads #vinylcommunity #45s #vinyl #vinylrecords #reasonstobecheerful

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Listening to 45's tonight. #45s #vinyl #vinyljunkie #vinylcommunity #xtc

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Long Live Vinyl – A Magazine

I rarely buy magazines nowadays as I never seem to have the time to read them when I do, apart from ‘Record Collector’ now and then, however, I was in town with a couple of hours to spare a few weekends ago and wandered into WH Smith with a view to getting something, although I hadn’t thought much about what, when I spied a new magazine, called ‘Long Live Vinyl’. It’s the size of a record sleeve, about 12″ x  12″, which is a nice idea and comes in at 114 pretty big pages, it is pricey though at £9.99.

I retired to a coffee shop with a Hazelnut Latte and set about reading. It had articles that I would probably expect to see, such as most valuable records in the world, classic album: Revolver, Essential Bowie and a nice piece on Roger Dean, who did the Yes albums and more. None of these came as much of a surprise but were interesting nonetheless and well illustrated with photographs. A guide to Brighton record shops was a good read and if I ever go there I’ll be re-reading before I set off and there was a nice 8 page piece featuring a collector of Price records. Also included were equipment reviews, headphones was one, turntables another, cleaning tips for records along with album releases, new and re-releases.

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It was a good read and I ended up in the coffee shop for about two hours, without reading everything, I still have some pages to go yet. I liked it, I didn’t like the price, but the magazine was really good and it’s great to see a magazine solely focused on vinyl so I wish them all the best with this venture.

Vinyl Supermarket

Yesterday I read a blog post by Lindsey  from April 2016 about supermarkets selling vinyl records, which had a negative opinion about it. I tend to agree with this but only to a point. As with CD’s, supermarkets sell what is in the charts or cheap re-issues of greatest hits, they don’t sell anything unusual or difficult to obtain, and don’t tend to do new releases unless they are by the biggest and most obvious artists. The same is currently true of their foray back into vinyl, they are all re-issues and offer and extremely limited selection at present. If it stays this way I’d have no problem with that, and was discussing it with the owner of Seismic Records in Leamington Spa the other month, who expressed concern. I understood this but as  said then, it opens the door for him in many ways as somebody buying one of these supermarket vinyls will, most likely, want to dig deeper into what is available, and where will they go to do that?

I think there is a degree of faddishness around the current increase in interest in vinyl records, which will fade again eventually, perhaps not in to the depths of obscurity that it fell before, but it will subside I believe and when it does, supermarkets will lose interest, but my positive outlook is that they will have helped fuel enough interest in enough people to sustain vinyl sales at a worthwhile level for the labels and artists to continue using it as a format.

I remember well when my own interest faded, which was due to CD’s. I didn’t have a CD player for a long time after the format became as big as it did but bought CD’s when I could anyway, in readiness for when I could get a player. I stopped buying vinyl at that point and when I finally got my CD player I started selling a lot of my records, which I regret now but there’s no point dwelling on that. The advent of MP3’s resulted in the same thing happening again, I stopped buying CD’s and now, with the advent of streaming music services I no longer buy MP3’s. Yet I’ve gone backwards, and buy Vinyl having not done so for a period of what must have been at least 10 years, probably 15. My remaining records went in a couple of crates in the loft, along with my music system as I played everything through bluetooth speakers from my phone or plugged my ipod into a dock and played things from there. One day I just brought it all back down from the loft, set it up, and I was of again, and there were a few reasons for this.

The first is ownership, I never really felt comfortable about owning MP3’s, I want something physical that I can hold and say, ‘This belongs to me’, which may be a bit shallow, a bit materialistic, but I don’t care. The second is size, CD’s are too small, I actually can’t read the liner notes nowadays (I do need new glasses though to be fair) as the text is so tiny and the artwork just looks better bigger. The third is most certainly a sense of nostalgia because it’s the format I grew up with. The fourth and final reason that comes to mind now is the sound, though I am not going to enter into any discussion of Digital vs Analogue the difference for me is that I am much more likely to play a record without headphones so that the sound fills the room, so that it travels through air to the ear making it seem richer and more real to me (and I like the crackles and pops as well, back to nostalgia).

Back to the supermarkets though, this is what I saw yesterday in my nearest large supermarket:

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And, for the very first time, a turntable, a crap one, but a turntable all the same:

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The albums are all pretty much classics, which I guess is a loss for the real record stores as it is their bread and butter I would think, but if you buy ‘The Queen Is Dead’ by the Smiths you may well want more, which the supermarkets don’t provide (bad choice actually as they do ‘Meat Is Murder’ as well), they do a couple of Beatles, a couple of Pink Floyd, a couple of Bowie and so on. If I look at the last 49 albums I bought, they don’t stock any of them, they did stock the 50th though as I bought it form there. Not a bad ratio although I am possibly not the best example of a normal purchaser of records.

All in all I think it’s neither a good thing or a bad thing that supermarkets stock vinyl, as long as they don’t try and provide what a real record store can, which I don’t think they will do. What is more worrying is the large corporate labels using up the limited resources of the record plants on re-issues of vinyl that could be picked up for a couple of pounds in a charity shop  to the detriment of the independent labels.

There is some delicate balancing to be done to ensure that the independent record store and publisher do not suffer too badly, and this can be done by the consumer. Personally I will always be using the record store and not the supermarket, at least at that 1 out of every 50 ratio as a maximum.